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About the book
  • Published: 25 February 2015
  • ISBN: 9780143107460
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 768
  • RRP: $42.99

The Portable Emerson


Formats & editions


This comprehensive new edition presents the core of Emerson's writings, including Nature and The American Scholar, along with revelatory journal entries, letters, poetry, and a sermon. Editor Jeffrey S. Cramer's update to his classic collection offers the staggering breadth of Emerson's ideas while introducing a stirringly human portrait of the man in all his infinitude.

Philosopher John Dewey called Ralph Waldo Emerson "the one citizen of the New World fit to have his name uttered in the same breath with that of Plato."

Through his writing and his own personal philosophy, Emerson unburdened his young country of Europe's traditional sense of history and showed Americans how to be creators of their own contexts. With his central text, Nature, he singlehandedly engendered an entire spiritual and intellectual movement in Transcendentalism.

Editor Jeffrey S. Cramer has chosen texts like Nature and The American Scholar, along with revelatory journal entries, letters and poetry revealing a stirringly human writer.

  • Pub date: 25 February 2015
  • ISBN: 9780143107460
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 768
  • RRP: $42.99

About the Authors

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Date: 2013-08-06
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803­-1882) was a renowned lecturer and writer, whose ideas on philosophy, religion, and literature influenced many writers, including Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman. After an undergraduate career at Harvard, he studied at Harvard Divinity School and became an ordained minister, continuing a long line of ministers in his family. He traveled widely and lectured, and became well known for his publications Essays and Nature.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, the son of a Unitarian minister and a chaplain during the American Revolution, was born in 1803 in Boston. He attended the Boston Latin School, and in 1817 entered Harvard, graduating in 1820. Emerson supported himself as a schoolteacher from 1821-26. In 1826 he was 'approbated to preach,' and in 1829 became pastor of the Scond Church (Unitarian) in Boston. That same year he married Ellen Louise Tucker, who was to die of tuberculosis only seventeen months later.

In 1832 Emerson resigned his pastorate and traveled to Eurpe, where he met Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Carlyle. He settled in Concord, Massachusetts, in 1834, where he began a new career as a public lecturer, and married Lydia Jackson a year later. A group that gathered around Emerson in Concord came to be known as 'the Concord school,' and included Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller.

Every year Emerson made a lecture tour; and these lectures were the source of most of his essays. Nature (1836), his first published work, contained the essence of his transcendental philosophy, which views the world of phenomena as a sort of symbol of the inner life and emphasizes individual freedom and self-reliance. Emerson's address to the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard (1837) and another address to the graduating class of the Harvard Divinity School (1838) applied his doctrine to the scholar and the clergyman, provoking sharp controversy. An ardent abolitionist, Emerson lectured and wrote widely against slavery from the 1840's through the Civil War.

His principal publications include two volumes of Essays (1841, 1844), Poems (1847), Representative Men (1850), The Conduct of Life (1860), and Society and Solitude (1870). He died of pneumonia in 1882 and was buried in Concord.


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