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About the book
  • Published: 7 November 2013
  • ISBN: 9781448191857
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 624

The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman




Sterne's utterly original novel - the meandering, maddening 'autobiography' of one of literature's oldest comic characters.

WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION BY TOM MCCARTHY

Doomed to become the ‘sport of fortune’ by an interruption at the crucial moment of conception, Tristram Shandy’s life lurches from one mishap to another: his nose crushed by the doctor’s forceps during birth, christened with the wrong name, an unfortunate incident involving a slamming sash window… Discover the anti-autobiography of the hilarious and impossibly long-winded Tristram Shandy.

  • Pub date: 7 November 2013
  • ISBN: 9781448191857
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 624

About the Author

Laurence Sterne

Date: 2013-08-06
Laurence Sterne was born in 1713, the younger son of a landowning Yorkshire family. He studied at Jesus College, Cambridge and was ordained in 1738. Sterne's dramas were mostly personal, including bitter quarrels with his wife and uncle, and some high profile affairs. The publication of the first volumes of The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy in 1759 made him famous throughout Europe overnight. He went on to complete the remaining volumes over the next seven years. Sterne died in 1768 of tuberculosis, the condition that had dogged him for many years.

Irish-born Laurence Sterne graduated from Cambridge in 1737 and took holy orders, becoming a prebend in York Cathedral. His masterpiece, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy made him a celebrity but ill-health necessitated recuperative travel and A Sentimental Journey grew out of seven-month trip through France and Italy. He died the year it was published, 1768.

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Praise for The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

“Tristram Shandy is one of the funniest novels in the English language. It's also one of the first great experimental literary works”

Independent

“A mad, recursive, literary joke”

Daily Telegraph

“An extraordinary comic tour de force”

Guardian

“The ultimate novel about writing a novel”

Sunday Telegraph

“An amazing book, seeming like a modern experimental novel but written in the 18th century by an Anglican clergyman. You can dip in and out of it with constant pleasure.”

Bamber Gasgoigne, Daily Express

“Has inspired and provoked writers as various as Dickens, Joyce and Salman Rushdie”

Observer

“Tristram Shandy’s open, digressive form offers both an alternative to the inevitable reductions of plot and a foil to the tyranny of the will to system.”

New Statesman


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