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About the book
  • Published: 1 November 2012
  • ISBN: 9781446468982
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

The World in the Evening




The best prose writer in English’ Gore Vidal

At a party in the Hollywood Hills, Stephen Monk finds his wife in the arms of another man. Betrayed and furious, he packs his belongings and returns to the home he was born in. There he begins to retrace the steps that have brought him to this crisis. He is reminded of his own betrayals and weaknesses. But most of all, the memory of his lost love, Elizabeth Rydal, haunts him. Can he forgive his wife, and most importantly, himself?

  • Pub date: 1 November 2012
  • ISBN: 9781446468982
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

About the Author

Christopher Isherwood

Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) was one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. He left Cambridge without graduating, briefly studied medicine and then turned to writing his first novels, All the Conspirators and The Memorial. Between 1929 and 1939 he lived mainly abroad, spending four years in Berlin and writing the novels Mr Norris Changes Trains and Goodbye to Berlin on which the musical Cabaret was based. He moved to America in 1939, becoming a US citizen in 1946, and wrote another five novels, including Down There on a Visit and A Single Man, a travel book about South America and a biography of the Indian mystic Ramakrishna. In the late 1960s and '70s he turned to autobiographical works: Kathleen and Frank, Christopher and His Kind, My Guru and His Disciple and October, one month of his diary with drawings by Don Bachardy.

Also by Christopher Isherwood

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Praise for The World in the Evening

“A brilliant enigma.”

New York Times

“W H AUDEN, Louis MacNeice, Stephen Spender, Christopher Isherwood, C Day Lewis. The brat-pack of their day. They are still considered by many to have been the great writers of the 1930s... Isherwood alone produced his greatest work during the thirties - Mr Norris Changes Trains (1935), Lions and Shadows (1938), Goodbye to Berlin (1939) - and yet more than any of the others he deserves to be regarded as a quintessentially modern writer, a writer with whom we can identify, a writer whose life was his work, and vice-versa.”

Guardian


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