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  • Published: 4 June 2013
  • ISBN: 9780451415851
  • Imprint: Signet
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 368
  • RRP: $7.99

The Sea-Wolf and Selected Stories



Impressed into service aboard the seal-hunting Ghost, Humphrey Van Weyden becomes an unwilling participant in a tense shipboard drama. With a wary eye, he watches the vessel’s abusive captain, Wolf Larsen, an enigma who can abandon two sailors on the open water, then return to reading the moral philosophers. One of the best sea novels ever written, The Sea-Wolf tells of mutiny, shipwreck, and a desperate confrontation.…Also in this volume, “The Law of Life,” “The One Thousand Dozen,” “All Gold Canyon,” and “Moon-Face” offer more riveting action and adventure. In these tales, London’s descriptions of the natives, the northern dogs, and even the tundra capture the essence of the exuberant life he experienced firsthand.

  • Published: 4 June 2013
  • ISBN: 9780451415851
  • Imprint: Signet
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 368
  • RRP: $7.99

About the author

Jack London

Jack London was born into poverty in San Francisco in 1876. Before his success as a novelist, London spent a lot of time avoiding a life as a manual worker and, in the process, experienced many things that became central to his plots. He ran away from home, bought a sailing boat and became an oyster pirate - a story recounted in John Barleycorn. His best-known novel, The Call of the Wild, was drawn from his own experience of the Klondike Gold Rush, a time that would inspire many of London's short stories as well. London became addicted to writing after winning a short story competition in the San Francisco Morning Call in 1893. It earned London $25, the equivalent of a month's wages. Dozens of books followed - including John Barleycorn (1913), The Call of the Wild (1903) and White Fang (1906). He published an average of three or four books a year. He died in 1916.

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Praise for The Sea-Wolf and Selected Stories

“He was a writer who excelled in describing cruelty, whose main theme indeed was the cruelty of Nature, or at any rate of contemporary life.…Life is a savage struggle, and victory has nothing to do with justice.”—George Orwell

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