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  • Published: 8 January 2018
  • ISBN: 9780141983240
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 512
  • RRP: $22.99

The Euro

And its Threat to the Future of Europe




The Nobel Prize-winning economist and bestselling author of Globalization and Its Discontents explains why saving Europe may mean abandoning the Euro

Designed to bring Europe closer together, the euro has actually done the opposite: after nearly a decade without growth, unity has been replaced with dissent and enlargements with prospective exits. Joseph Stiglitz argues that Europe's stagnation and bleak outlook are a direct result of the fundamental flaws inherent in the euro project - economic integration outpacing political integration with a structure that actively promotes divergence rather than convergence. Money relentlessly leaves the weaker member states and goes to the strong, with debt accumulating in a few ill-favoured countries. The question now is: can the euro be saved? This important book, by one of the world's leading economists, addresses the euro-crisis on a bigger intellectual scale than any predecessor.

  • Published: 8 January 2018
  • ISBN: 9780141983240
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 512
  • RRP: $22.99

About the author

Joseph Stiglitz

Joseph Stiglitz was Chief Economist at the World Bank until January 2000. Before that he was Chairman of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisors. He is currently Professor of Finance and Economics at Columbia University. He won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2001.

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Praise for The Euro

Stiglitz could hardly have timed The Euro better . . . one of those economists with a rare ability to help readers understand complex ideas

Philip Aldrick, The Times

Original, hard-hitting . . . Much more than a demolition job. These chapters are full of constructive proposals

Martin Sandbu, Financial Times

Terrific and clarifying

Peter Goodman, The New York Times

Coolly analytical . . . he is surely right: without a radical overhaul of its workings, the Euro seems all but certain to fail

Economist

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