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About the book
  • Published: 26 October 2011
  • ISBN: 9781742746616
  • Imprint: Random House Australia
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 264
Categories:

Lateshows




Our Hero explores contemporary protocols - of family, food and art - looks at the tragic evanescence of technology and investigates meal reform and the science of life.

Our Hero explores contemporary protocols - of family, food and art - looks at the tragic evanescence of technology and investigates meal reform and the science of life.

THE CLUB. I also thought I moved with what was called the Fast Crowd but I have begun to face up to the slowing of the Fast Crowd. My friends now not only move with a more leisurely pace, I observe, but with an undignified lack of urgency, are slower to rise from their chairs, and also, I have noticed, they have begun to procreate. The Late Family had arrived in my life. For some of my friends the Late Family had replaced the Late Show.

THE MOVIE This is a story about how the flow of life is made into stories, how stories become films, how the making of stories and films itself becomes stories, and how stories become the flow of life.

THE CABARET VOLTAIRE It occurs to me that the telephone answering machine is something of a wall, albeit a friendly wall. Robert Frost’s neighbour says that good fences make good neighbours. Good greetings on a telephone answering machine make good telephone neighbours. But as Frost says, ‘Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, That wants it down.’ I suppose some people do not like the wall to joke. There will always be those types. The telephone answering machine could be seen as the dog Cerberus barking at the gates of Hades. The dog Cerberus didn’t stop people coming into Hades - he stopped people going out. The telephone answering machine is Cerberus trying to prevent the people who come down the dark tunnel of the telephone from getting away. It holds them by their voice, seizes them by their throat.

  • Pub date: 26 October 2011
  • ISBN: 9781742746616
  • Imprint: Random House Australia
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 264

About the Author

Frank Moorhouse

Frank Moorhouse was born in the coastal town of Nowra, NSW. He worked as an editor of small-town newspapers and as an administrator and in 1970s became a full-time writer. He has won national prizes for his fiction, non-fiction, and essays. He is best known for the highly acclaimed Edith trilogy, Grand Days, Dark Palace, and Cold Light, novels which follow the career of an Australian woman in the League of Nations in the 1920s and 1930s through to the International Atomic Energy Agency in the 1970s as she struggled to become a diplomat. His most recent book published last year by Penguin Random House is The Drover’s Wifea reading adventure. which brings together works inspired by Henry Lawson’s story and examines the attachment Australia has to the story and to Russell Drysdale’s painting of the same name. Frank has been awarded a number of fellowships including writer in residence at King’s College Cambridge, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington. His work has been translated into several languages. He was made a member of the Order of Australia for services to literature in 1985 and was made a Doctor of the University by Griffith University in 1997 and a Doctor of Letters (honoris causa) by the University of Sydney, 2015.

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Praise for Lateshows

““ Australia’s funniest writer.” Clive James”

““ Australia’s funniest writer.” Toronto Star”

““ Australia’s funniest writer.” Donald Horne”

““Is Woody Allen New York’s Frank Moorhouse?” Shelagh Rogers, CBC”


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