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Did you know that an assassin is a hashish-eater and a yokel a country woodpecker?

That Dr Mesmer mesmerised patients back to health or that Samuel Pepys enjoyed a good game of handicap?

While we're at it, what have spondulics to do with spines or lawyers with avocados?

In It's a Wonderful Word, bestselling author Albert Jack collects over 500 of the strangest, funniest-sounding and most downright delightful words in the English language, and traces them back to their often puzzling origins. While brushing up on your gibberish or gobbledygook, discover why bastards should resent travelling salesmen, why sheets should remain on tenterhooks and why you should never set down a tumbler before finishing your drink.

From blotto to bamboozle and from claptrap to quango, Albert Jack's addictive anecdotes bring the world's most colourful language to life and are guaranteed to surprise and entertain.

Formats & editions

  • Paperback

    9780099562320

    July 15, 2012

    Arrow

    288 pages

    RRP $22.99

    Online retailers

    • Abbey's Bookshop
    • Angus & Robertson Bookworld
    • Booktopia
    • Boomerang Books
    • Collins Booksellers
    • Dymocks
    • Books Kinokuniya
    • The Nile
    • QBD
    • Readings
    • Robinsons Bookshop
    Or

    Find your local bookstore at booksellers.org.au

  • EBook

    9781446456095

    November 3, 2011

    Cornerstone Digital

    288 pages

    Online retailers

    • iBooks
    • Amazon Kindle
    • Booktopia
    • eBooks
    • Google Play
    • Kobo
    Or

    Find your local bookstore at booksellers.org.au

Also by Albert Jack

What Caesar Did For My Salad
The Old Dog And Duck
Pop Goes The Weasel
Albert Jacks Ten-Minute Mysteries
Shaggy Dogs And Black Sheep

Recommendations

Sapiens
Albanese
At Home
Fifteen Young Men
Charlatan
The Water Kingdom
The Story of the Jews
Long Road from Jarrow
Queer City
Spitalfields
Home and Away
Flaneuse
Fifty Years of Hurt
A Walk in the Park
The Long Weekend
The Black Prince of Florence
The German War
Republic or Death!
The Private Lives of the Saints
Neither Nowt Nor Summat