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Engineer In The Garden
  • Published: 31 March 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446466988
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 398
Categories:

Engineer In The Garden




Does for genetics what THE BLIND WATCHMAKER did for biology: it explains, it excites, it makes us imagine and think. Nature is the 'garden' of the title; the 'engineer' is the geneticist, far less in control than he or she thinks.

Today we are developing a science that could change the world - for good or ill - more quickly and more profoundly than ever before. The science of genetics promises - or threatens - nothing less than the creation of life.

Colin Tudge leads the reader gently through the deepest intricacies of genetics. He traces its history. He explores its awesome power and its current applications. And he speculates on its thrilling - or terrifying - future. He has written an essential book for anyone interested in the future of the human race.

  • Published: 31 March 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446466988
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 398
Categories:

About the author

Colin Tudge

Colin Tudge three-time winner of the Glaxo/ABSW Science Writer of the Year Award, is the author of eight books, including Animals at the Zoo, The Day Before Yesterday and The Engineer in the Garden. He has lectured widely and is a regular contributor to the New Scientist, the Independent and the Independent on Sunday.

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Praise for Engineer In The Garden

The Engineer in the Garden is an engagingly quirky and broadly informed account of modern genetics, heredity and evolution that teems with the latest facts, briskly and brightly conveyed... If you are concerned about the genetic future, you could do no better than to read this wise and thoughtful book.

Sunday Telegraph

In his excellent account of what we are about to let ourselves in for, Colin Tudge unravels the mysteries of genetic engineering and its applications with great skill.

Daily Telegraph

A mammoth task at which he succeeds admirably.

Economist

Could not be bettered as a popular introduction to genetic knowledge.

Independent on Sunday

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