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  • Published: 31 October 2011
  • ISBN: 9781448112562
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 208
Categories:

War, Baby

The Glamour of Violence




An astonishing piece of boxing writing, detailing one of the most vicious, controversial and tragic fights of the last thirty years, between Britain's Nigel Benn and American Gerald McClellan, written by the Sports Journalist of the Year 2000.

25th February 1995 The Dark Destroyer vs the G-ManNigel Benn and Gerald McClennan. Two men with a reputation to defend - a reputation for brutal, unforgiving combat both in the ring and outside it. Ostensibly, they were fighting for a world title and a lot of money, the stuff of professional boxing. But this fight was different. It was a rare collision of wills, and few present had seen anything like it. After ten of the most gruelling and vicious rounds that the sport of boxing has ever witnessed McClellan finally was defeated. He knelt in his corner on one knee in submission. The injuries he received that night left him blind, half-deaf and paralysed. This is the story of what brought these two men together on the night of 25th February 1995 and how that night changed them forever. It's a story too about those associated with the promotion of public fist-fighting, who bend morality to suit their needs. It's a story that attempts to unravel the glamour of violence.

  • Published: 31 October 2011
  • ISBN: 9781448112562
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 208
Categories:

About the author

Kevin Mitchell

Kevin Mitchell is the Observer's chief sports writer. He is the author of War, Baby, which was shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year, and the co-author of Frank Bruno's autobiography Frank, which won the Best Autobiography category of the British Sports Book Awards.

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Praise for War, Baby

Solid, straight-talking and as rock’n’roll as sports writing gets.

The Scotsman

Powerfully taut account of Benn v McClellan brawl captures boxing’s farce and nobility.

The Observer

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