> Skip to content
The Mottled Lizard
  • Published: 31 May 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446475799
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 336

The Mottled Lizard




'An accomplished story-teller, she weaves ancdotes, character sketches, political history together without losing her thread or the reader's momentum. ' Sunday Times

In this sequel to The Flame of Thika, Elspeth Huxley takes up her story after the family returns to Kenya after the First World War. Her family and friends, their home and their travels, the glorious wildlife and scenery, described in rich and loving detail, all spring to life in this enchanting book. 'She knows East Africa and she loves it. . . with a critical and understanding sympathy. ' The Times 'What a marvellous writer. . . and what a Kenya it was. ' Financial Times

  • Published: 31 May 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446475799
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 336

About the author

Elspeth Huxley

Elspeth Huxley was born in 1906, the daughter of Major Josceline Grant of Njoro, Kenya, where she spent most of her childhood. She was educated at the European School in Nairobi and at Reading University where she took a diploma in agriculture, and at Cornell University, USA. In 1929 she joined the Empire Marketing Board as a press officer. She married Gervas Huxley in 1931 and travelled widely with him in America, Africa and elsewhere. She was on the BBC General Advisory Council from 1952 to 1959, when she joined the Monckton Advisory Commission on Central Africa. She wrote novels, detective fiction, biography and travel titles, and her books include The Mottled Lizard (1962), The Challenge of Africa (1971), Livingstone and His African Journeys (1974), Florence Nightingale (1975), Scott of the Antartic (1977), Nellie: Letters from Africa (1980), Whipsnade: Captive Breeding for Survival (1981), The Prince Buys the Manor (1982), Last Days in Eden and Out in the Midday Sun: My Kenya (1985). She dies in 1997.

Also by Elspeth Huxley

See all

Praise for The Mottled Lizard

She knows East Africa and she loves it - the people, black and white, and the wild beauy of its countryside - with a critical and understanding sympathy

The Times

More lyrical than the first volume

The Washington Post

Related titles