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  • Published: 1 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781409015802
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

The Midnight Choir




A magnificant follow up to Little Criminals. Frightening, violent, unputdownable

Tense and expertly plotted, The Midnight Choir is a stunning portrayal of life on the edge of society.

Dublin. Joshua Boyce watches a jewellers from a rented flat across the road, noting the comings and goings as he plans a job; Dixie Peyton, desperate for cash, attempts to mug an American tourist, threatening him with a syringe purporting to contain HIV-infected blood; Detective Inspector Synott calls on an alleged rape suspect, already convinced of the boy's guilt; gangland leader Lar MacKendrick is working out, getting back in shape after brother Jo-Jo was viciously murdered. Meanwhile in Galway, Garda Joe Mills apprehends a jumper from a pub roof and discovers that the man is covered in dried blood.

In Little Criminals, Kerrigan gave a small insight into a previously unseen underworld. In The Midnight Choir that world explodes. We enter a gritty landscape of characters with questionable and contrary ideals; all struggling to survive in a time and place that's constantly knocking them back. Everyone has an axe to grind; criminals and police alike live by their own code, with both sides resorting to desperate measures as a means to an end. Law enforcement is often murky, and getting away with it is everything, no matter which side you're on.

The Midnight Choir is a magnificent accomplishment, a powerful and intricate novel, driven to the last page at a tremendous pace by an original voice.

  • Published: 1 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781409015802
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

About the author

Gene Kerrigan

Veteran journalist Gene Kerrigan is the author of four acclaimed novels, the most recent of which, The Rage, won the CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel of the Year.

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Praise for The Midnight Choir

Absorbing, beautifully written, gritty tale

The Times

Kerrigan has always been one of this country's leading journalists. With this novel, he becomes one of its leading writers. The Midnight Choir is both riveting and disquieting

Irish Times

The writing is fiercely unsentimental, the plotting complex and the characterisation pleasingly contrary ... This ... will stay with you for a long time

Metro

Little Criminals marked Kerrigan out as a truly ambitious crime writer, with a dextrous use of language married to masterful plotting. In a very different genre, he has something of James Joyce's ability in conjuring up a vivid Dublin

Independent

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