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  • Published: 30 September 2012
  • ISBN: 9781448130146
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

The Call of the Wild and White Fang




A thrilling tale of Buck's fight for survival and rise to become leader of the pack

Buck is the pampered offspring of a St Bernard and a shepherd dog. When men find gold in the Yukon Buck's comfortable life in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley comes to an end. Kidnapped and dragged away to be a sledge dog in the harsh and freezing North, Buck must fight for survival.

This edition also includes White Fang

  • Published: 30 September 2012
  • ISBN: 9781448130146
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 352

About the author

Jack London

Jack London was born into poverty in San Francisco in 1876. Before his success as a novelist, London spent a lot of time avoiding a life as a manual worker and, in the process, experienced many things that became central to his plots. He ran away from home, bought a sailing boat and became an oyster pirate - a story recounted in John Barleycorn. His best-known novel, The Call of the Wild, was drawn from his own experience of the Klondike Gold Rush, a time that would inspire many of London's short stories as well. London became addicted to writing after winning a short story competition in the San Francisco Morning Call in 1893. It earned London $25, the equivalent of a month's wages. Dozens of books followed - including John Barleycorn (1913), The Call of the Wild (1903) and White Fang (1906). He published an average of three or four books a year. He died in 1916.

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Praise for The Call of the Wild and White Fang

One hundred and one years after its publication, it is still enthralling. The opening chapters are haunting, their depiction of the wilderness of snow, ice and forest faced by gold prospectors exquisite and terrifying. The menace of ever-present death, for man, dog and wolf alike, in a setting of remorseless beauty, is bracing and humbling

Herald

Raw narratives of visceral appeal whose cinematic energy cry out for film adaptation

Robert McCrum, Observer

A searing book about man and animals and the inherent wildness in the nature of the dog. It's a very stark book in some ways but it really conjures up the atmosphere of Gold Rush-era Yukon

Daily Express

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