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  • Published: 1 November 2010
  • ISBN: 9780099541592
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 480
  • RRP: $22.99

See Under Love



Innovative and daring retelling of the horrors of Jewish history, likened to The Tin Drum and One Hundred Years of Solitude

Momik, the only child of two survivors, is brought up in Israel by a family seeking to ignore the past. No-one will explain to him what life was like ‘Over There’ or what the ‘Nazi Beast’ is. His 9-year-old mind imagines a Nazi Beast hiding in the cellar, waiting to feed on Jews. Momik increasingly shields himself from all feeling and attachment. But through the stories his great-uncle tells him—the same stories he told the commandant of a Nazi concentration camp—Momik, too, becomes “infected with humanity.”

See Under: Love is a luminously imaginative and profoundly affecting work.

  • Published: 1 November 2010
  • ISBN: 9780099541592
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 480
  • RRP: $22.99

About the author

David Grossman

David Grossman is the bestselling author of numerous works, which have been translated into thirty-six languages. His most recent novel, A Horse Walks into a Bar, was awarded the International Man Booker Prize 2017, and shortlisted for the TLS-Risa Domb/Porjes Prize 2019. Grossman is also the recipient of the French Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and the 2010 Frankfurt Peace Prize.

Also by David Grossman

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Praise for See Under Love

One of the most ambitious, generous, beautiful, indispensable books I've been fortunate enough to read

Jonathan Safran Foer, Guardian

See Under: Loveis one of the most disturbing novels I've ever read...When I was already well into it, I'd circle it warily before picking it up again . . . then fall instantly under its spell, for it is wickedly readable

Edmund White

This novel is so innovative, yet at the same time so readable, that I can only say that it gives the lie to that critical cliche. It is a tour de force of pure storytelling, and a demonstration of both the need for story and the limits of all particular stories. I consider it a triumph

Guardian

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