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  • Published: 15 February 2011
  • ISBN: 9781409028987
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 416

Reality is Broken

Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World




How we can harness the power of games to solve real world problems and improve our lives.

We are living in a world full of games.
More than 31 million people in the UK are gamers.
The average young person will spend 10,000 hours gaming by the age of twenty-one.
The future belongs to those who play games.

In this ground-breaking book, visionary game designer Jane McGonigaI challenges conventional thinking and shows that games - far from being simply escapist entertainment - have the potential not only to radically improve our own lives but to change the world.

  • Published: 15 February 2011
  • ISBN: 9781409028987
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 416

About the author

Jane McGonigal

Jane McGonigal, Ph.D. is the Director of Game Research and Development at the Institute for the Future. Her work has been featured in The Economist, Wired, and The New York Times; and on MTV, CNN, and NPR. In 2009, BusinessWeek called her one of the 10 most important innovators to watch. She has given keynote addresses at TED, South by Southwest Interactive, the Game Developers Conference and was a featured speaker at The New Yorker Conference.

Praise for Reality is Broken

Reality is broken is the most powerful justification yet for computer games as part of our central literacies - parallel to literature or movies in the way they connect our motivations and energies within the challenges of understanding and intervening in our social worlds

Pat Kane, Independent

The book serves as an ambitious call to arms to games designers to make the real world as satisfying as the virtual world of gaming... There are a number of astute observations here, with lots of big ideas that will undoubtedly come into focus over the coming years, and it will serve as a n effective anecdote to the relentless dismissal of gaming culture.

Davin O'Dwyer, Irish Times

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