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  • Published: 1 July 2010
  • ISBN: 9781409021308
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240

Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha




A new Vintage Classics edition of Roddy Doyle's beloved prizewinning novel, part of a new set of beautifully presented Irish classics

WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE 1993

Paddy Clarke is ten years old. Paddy Clarke lights fires. Paddy Clarke's name is written in wet cement all over Barrytown. Paddy Clarke's heroes are Father Damien (and the lepers), Geronimo and George Best. Paddy Clarke knows the exact moment to knock a dead scab from his knee. Paddy Clarke hates his brother Francis because that's the rule. Paddy Clarke loves his Ma and Da, but it seems like they don't love each other, and Paddy wants to understand, but can't.

See also: Cal by Bernard MacLaverty

  • Published: 1 July 2010
  • ISBN: 9781409021308
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240

About the author

Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle was born in Dublin in 1958. He is the author of eleven acclaimed novels including The Commitments, The Snapper, The Van and Smile, two collections of short stories, and Rory & Ita, a memoir about his parents. He won the Booker Prize in 1993 for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha.

Also by Roddy Doyle

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Praise for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha

Truthful, hilarious, painfully sad

Spectator

Gloriously triumphant...confirms Doyle as the best novelist of his generation

Literary Review

It is 1968. Paddy Clarke is ten years old, breathless with discovery. He reads with a child's voraciousness, collecting facts the way adults collect grey hairs and parking tickets. Doyle captures the speech patterns of childhood brilliantly, the weird logic of the incessant questions, the non-sequiturs and wonderments... Like all great comic writers, Roddy Doyle has become an explorer of the deepest places of the heart, of love and pain and loss. This is one of the most compelling novels I've read in ages, a triumph of style and perception

Irish Times

Extraordinary technical achievement and emotional force

Gillian Beer

One of the truest and funniest presentations of juvenile experience in any recent literature

Mick Imlah, Independent

Brimming with sadness, but full of fun

Sunday Times

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