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  • Published: 14 September 2021
  • ISBN: 9780241505458
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $22.99

Mexico Set




The second novel in the Game, Set and Match trilogy is a gripping study in the art of spy enrolment

World-weary agent Bernard Samson is losing control of his personal and professional life. Sent to Mexico to aid the defection of a KGB agent to the West, he has a chance to prove his worth. Instead he is torn between conflicting loyalties, and lost in a maze of double-dealing and duplicity. The second novel in the Game, Set and Match trilogy is a gripping portrayal of a man who can trust no one, not even those closest to him.

  • Published: 14 September 2021
  • ISBN: 9780241505458
  • Imprint: Penguin Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $22.99

About the author

Len Deighton

Len Deighton is the author of over thirty bestsellers of carefully researched fiction and non-fiction. His history writing was encouraged by A. J. P. Taylor and his books are noted for the picture they provide of the German side of the fighting as well as that of the Allies. His books include Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain and Blood, Tears and Folly: An Objective Look at World War II, both published by Pimlico.

Also by Len Deighton

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Praise for Mexico Set

Deighton is back in his original milieu, the bleak spy world of betrayers and betrayed.

Observer

Deighton is a marvel ... few authors writing in the rigorous and finite genre of spy fiction have mastered the craft as well as Deighton ... Mexico Set is a pure tale, told by an author at the height of his power.

Chicago Tribune

For sheer readability he has no peer.

Evening Standard

Like lying back in a hot bath with a large malt whisky - absolute bliss.

Sunday Telegraph

Len Deighton's spy novels are so good they make me sad the Cold War is over.

Len Deighton

Deighton's outstanding achievement is the nine-volume series chronicling the life and times of Bernard Samson ... Deighton's Samson trilogies are as much about the elusiveness of human interactions as espionage. Spying is not a secret world sealed off from ordinary life but an extension of the world we all live in.

John Gray, New Statesman

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