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  • Published: 30 September 2021
  • ISBN: 9780141996011
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 368

MAMista




Marxist revolutionaries fight for their lives in the jungles of Spanish Guyana, in a dramatic departure for Len Deighton

Deep in Marxist Guerilla territory a hopeless war is being fought.

The Berlin Wall is demolished. Marx is dead. Try telling that to Ramon and his desperate men hiding in the jungle cradling their AK 47s, dusting off the slabs of Semtex and dreaming of world revolution.

MAMista takes us to the dusty, violent capital of Spanish Guiana in South America, and thence into the depths of the rain forest. There, four people become caught up in a struggle both political and personal, a struggle corrupted by ironies and deceits, and riddled with the accidents of war. They are four people who never should have found themselves bound together in a mission for revolution, which may be the sentence of death.

Never has Deighton portrayed so accurately the terror and the tedium of war, or the shifting alliances and betrayals between people who have nothing to lose but their lives.

  • Published: 30 September 2021
  • ISBN: 9780141996011
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 368

About the authors

Len Deighton

Len Deighton is the author of over thirty bestsellers of carefully researched fiction and non-fiction. His history writing was encouraged by A. J. P. Taylor and his books are noted for the picture they provide of the German side of the fighting as well as that of the Allies. His books include Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain and Blood, Tears and Folly: An Objective Look at World War II, both published by Pimlico.

Praise for MAMista

Deighton's longest, most complex and passionate novel in years: an epic tale, set in a South American jungle, of good men and women crushed beneath the heel of Realpolitik.

Kirkus Review

You will be hooked from the first chapter and enjoy every line ... The Berlin Wall may have tumbled, destroying overnight a whole spy cottage industry, but as the dust settles Len Deighton rises like the phoenix ... a superb novel.

Bryan Forbes, Sunday Express

Moral ambiguity used to be called Greeneland. Since Graham Greene's death, that territory is open for conquest. At least part of it ought to be renamed Deightonsville.

TIME

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