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  • Published: 14 November 2016
  • ISBN: 9780241954652
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 432
  • RRP: $27.99

How to Plan a Crusade

Reason and Religious War in the High Middle Ages




A lively and compelling account of how the crusades really worked, and a revolutionary attempt to rethink the Middle Ages

In this highly original and enjoyable book, Christopher Tyerman focuses on the massive, all-encompassing and hugely costly business of actually preparing a crusade. The efforts of many thousands of men and women, who left their lands and families in Western Europe, and marched off to a highly uncertain future in the Holy Land and elsewhere have never been sufficiently understood. How to Plan a Crusade is fascinating on diplomacy, communications, propaganda, the use of mass media, medical care, equipment, voyages, money, weapons, credit, wills, ransoms, animals, and the power of prayer. It brings to life an extraordinary era in a novel and surprising way.

  • Published: 14 November 2016
  • ISBN: 9780241954652
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 432
  • RRP: $27.99

About the author

Christopher Tyerman

Christopher Tyerman is a Fellow in History at Hertford College, Oxford, and a lecturer in Medieval History at New College, Oxford. He is the author of England and the Crusades and The Crusades: A Very Short Introduction.

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Praise for How to Plan a Crusade

Magisterial . . . Medieval is often associated with barbarism and bigotry, but this fascinating study suggests it should refer to meticulous preparation . . . a lively book, laced with wry asides and surprising details

Jessie Childs, Guardian

Tyerman's book is fascinating not just for what it has to tell us about the Crusades, but for the mirror it holds up to today's religious extremism

Tom Holland, Mail on Sunday

Not merely a splendid book but a timely one

Dan Jones, Sunday Times

Elegant, readable . . . an impressive synthesis . . . Not many historians could have done it

Jonathan Sumption, Spectator

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