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The Fault In Our Stars
The Fault In Our Stars John Green
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (author of Looking for Alaska and Paper Towns) is a teen romance with a twist, exploring the tragic business of being alive and in love. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw - The Fault in Our Stars is perfect for young adults and adults alike.
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Turtles All the Way Down
Turtles All the Way Down John Green
In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza's story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.
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John Green Fast Facts
John Green Fast Facts Article

10 things to know about The Fault in Our Stars author.

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New from John Green
New from John Green News

Turtles All the Way Down will publish 10 October 2017.

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10 Things to Know about the New Book from John Green
10 Things to Know about the New Book from John Green Article

Itching for more information about the new book from John Green? Us too. Here’s everything you need to know.

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Let It Snow
Let It Snow John Green, Lauren Myracle, Maureen Johnson
Three holiday romances by three bestselling authors, including John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars. Now a major movie from Netflix.
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Mum's List
Mum's List St John Greene
Mum's List is an incredibly moving story of courage and love, telling of Kate's wonderful life and how, through her list, she lives on in the daily lives of her family, helping Singe move forward as he raises their boys alone.
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Turtles All the Way Down
Turtles All the Way Down Extract

Chapter 1

At the time I first realized I might be fictional, my weekdays were spent at a publicly funded institution on the north side of Indianapolis called White River High School, where I was required to eat lunch at a particular time—between 12:37 P.M. and 1:14 P.M.—by forces so much larger than myself that I couldn't even begin to identify them. If those forces had given me a different lunch period, or if the tablemates who helped author my fate had chosen a differ­ent topic of conversation that September day, I would've met a different end—or at least a different middle. But I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.

Of course, you pretend to be the author. You have to. You think, I now choose to go to lunch, when that monotone beep rings from on high at 12:37. But really, the bell decides. You think you're the painter, but you're the canvas.

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