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The Book Of Tea
The Book Of Tea Kakuzo Okakura
This 1906 guide to the beauty of the tea ceremony is both a paean to the art of simplicity, and a wry critique of the West's view of Japan.
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Letters To A Young Poet
Letters To A Young Poet Rainer Maria Rilke
The poet Rilke's lyrical and life-changing advice to an aspiring young writer is among the most inspiring expressions of youthful creativity there has ever been.
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Oroonoko
Oroonoko Aphra Behn
Written by spy, traveller and pioneering female writer Aphra Benn, this story of an African prince sold into slavery is considered one of the earliest English novels.
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Frogs
Frogs Aristophanes Aristophanes, Aristophanes
This riotous play from ancient Greece's greatest comic dramatist blends fancy dress, earthy slapstick and political debate.
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Love That Moves The Sun And Other Stars
Love That Moves The Sun And Other Stars Dante Dante, Dante Alighieri
Heavenly verse evoking dancing souls and blinding flares from Paradiso - the blazing finale to Dante's Italian masterpiece The Divine Comedy.
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Lady Susan
Lady Susan Jane Austen
Glittering with Austen's subversive young imagination, this wicked early novella features a devious, adulterous anti-heroine.
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My Life Had Stood A Loaded Gun
My Life Had Stood A Loaded Gun Emily Dickinson
Electrifying poems of isolation, beauty, death and eternity from a reclusive genius and one of America's greatest writers.
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Daphnis And Chloe
Daphnis And Chloe Longus
Two young lovers battle pirates, rivals and their own confused feelings in this tender pastoral romance from ancient Greece.
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A Terrible Beauty Is Born
A Terrible Beauty Is Born William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats
By turns joyful and despairing, some of the twentieth century's greatest verse on fleeting youth, fervent hopes and futile sacrifice.
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Only Dull People Are Brilliant At Breakfast
Only Dull People Are Brilliant At Breakfast Oscar Wilde
Wilde's celebrated witticisms on the dangers of sincerity, duplicitous biographers, the stupidity of the English - and his own genius.
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O Frabjous Day!
O Frabjous Day! Lewis Carroll
Conjuring wily walruses, dancing lobsters, a Jabberwock and a Bandersnatch, Carroll's fantastical verse gave new words to the English language.
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Tyger, Tyger
Tyger, Tyger William Blake
From the great visionary and radical genius of the Romantic age, transcendent verse on heaven and hell, innocence and experience.
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Is This A Dagger Which I See Before Me?
Is This A Dagger Which I See Before Me? William Shakespeare
This collection of Shakespeare's soliloquies, from famous set-pieces to little-known speeches, displays his genius in all its range and richness.
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How To Be A Medieval Woman
How To Be A Medieval Woman Margery Kempe
Advice on marriage, foreign travel and much more from the irrepressible Margery Kempe: medieval pilgrim, visionary and creator of the first autobiography.
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Trivia
Trivia John Gay
This joyful poetic satire describes wig thieves, chamberpots, prostitutes and other hazards to be avoided on the teeming streets of eighteenth-century London.
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