> Skip to content
  • Published: 6 September 2012
  • ISBN: 9781409029366
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240
Categories:

Visions of England

Or Why We Still Dream of a Place in the Country



A major contribution to the debate about English identity that locates the roots of Englishness in the cultural imagination.

Why do we still get misty-eyed about England's green and pleasant land?

What explains our obsession with country houses - from the National Trust to Downton Abbey?

Why do we still dream of a place in the country?

In this delightul book Roy Strong explores the definition of Englishness. Celebrating our literature, music, art, gardening and drama, Strong identifies those icons and traditions that still speak to us - it is a vision of England that is inclusive and relevant for everybody living in the country today.

  • Published: 6 September 2012
  • ISBN: 9781409029366
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 240
Categories:

About the author

Roy Strong

Sir Roy Strong was director of the National Portrait Gallery from 1967 to 1971 and director of the Victoria & Albert Museum from 1974 to 1987, when he resigned to become a full-time writer, broadcaster and consultant. His books include The Story of Britain, The Arts in Britain, Coronation: A History of Kingship and the British Monarchy and, most recently, A Little History of the English Country Church.

Also by Roy Strong

See all

Praise for Visions of England

Compelling and essential... It is so uplifting to read... An answer, one among many, to the deconstructors and under-cutters of the very idea of Englishness... It is based on conviction and experience

Financial Times

We should be grateful to Sir Roy Strong for this book. It is an exploration of the themes that shape our sense of England: a meditation, a hymn, a road map

Clive Aslet, Country Life

Insightful and provocative... Strong's emphasis on the pastoral tradition is a valuable reminder of the essential continuity that binds together English history

Dominic Sandbrook, Prospect

For someone who would like to know what it is to feel identifiably English, Sir Roy provides a useful tour

Simon Heffer, Spectator

Related titles