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About the book
  • Published: 1 October 2015
  • ISBN: 9780857984074
  • Imprint: Vintage Australia
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 352
  • RRP: $19.99

The Writing Life




Who else, but a writer, is really able to interrogate the work of other writers?

Who else, but a writer, is really able to interrogate the work of other writers?

From Christina Stead, Les Murray and Patrick White to Proust, Shakespeare and Charlotte Bronte, David Malouf reads and examines the work of writers who have challenged, inspired and entertained us for generations. He also explores his own work and the life of the writer, where the ever-present danger is spending too much time talking about writing and not enough doing it.

These alternative views of some of our best-loved writers and readers will send us scurrying back to read Jane Eyre, Kipling and of course, David Malouf.

  • Pub date: 1 October 2015
  • ISBN: 9780857984074
  • Imprint: Vintage Australia
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 352
  • RRP: $19.99

About the Author

David Malouf

David Malouf is the internationally acclaimed author of novels including Ransom, The Great World (winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ prize and the Prix Femina Etranger), Remembering Babylon (winner of the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award), An Imaginary Life, Conversations at Curlow Creek, Dream Stuff, Every Move You Make and his autobiographical classic 12 Edmondstone Street. His Collected Stories won the 2008 Australia-Asia Literary Award. His most recent books are A First Place and The Writing Life. He was born in 1934 and was brought up in Brisbane.

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Praise for The Writing Life

“Best book of 2015.”

Sonia Lee, Gleaner

“An elegant and sustained examination of one question: what does it mean to be a writer? To read this book is to be inspired, and how could you not be when you read, now, with the sense of a benevolent and polymath reader, considered and considerate, just there, at your shoulder, to help you along? David Malouf is tops; he’s a boon to our myriad imaginary lives.”

Ashley Hay, The Australian

“Malouf posits a 'writing self' and a 'reading self', recognising them as distinct but complementary entities, and throught The Writing Life they are engaged in an illuminating conversation. His critical analysis includes autobiographical details, as if part of a work's significance is the effect it has had on him. Among Malouf's many writing identities - novelist, poet, memoirist, librettist - that of the literary critic might seem to be the least of his achievements, but The Writing Life demonstrates what an attentive and thoughtful reader he is. These essays not only offer interpretations of some of the great writers who have shaped Malouf's sensibility, they are themselves part of a literary 'process of discovery'.”

James Ley, The Sydney Morning Herald


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