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About the book
  • Published: 14 November 2001
  • ISBN: 9780141186672
  • Imprint: Peng. Mod. Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 256
  • RRP: $19.99

The Man In The High Castle




Philip K. Dick's cult novel - now in an official tie-in edition to accompany the new TV series.

A dazzling speculative novel of 'counterfactual history' from one of America's most highly-regarded science fiction authors, Philip K. Dick's The Man in the High Castle includes an introduction by Eric Brown in Penguin Modern Classics.

Philip K. Dick's acclaimed cult novel gives us a horrifying glimpse of an alternative world - one where the Allies have lost the Second World War. In this nightmare dystopia the Nazis have taken over New York, the Japanese control California and the African continent is virtually wiped out. In a neutral buffer zone in America that divides the world's new rival superpowers, lives the author of an underground bestseller. His book offers a new vision of reality - an alternative theory of world history in which the Axis powers were defeated - giving hope to the disenchanted. Does 'reality' lie with him, or is his world just one among many others?

Philip Kindred Dick (1928-82) was born in Chicago in 1928. His career as a science fiction writer comprised an early burst of short stories followed by a stream of novels, typically character studies incorporating androids, drugs, and hallucinations. His best works are generally agreed to be The Man in the High Castle and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the inspiration for the movie Blade Runner.
If you enjoyed The Man in the High Castle, you might like Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, also available in Penguin Classics.

  • Pub date: 14 November 2001
  • ISBN: 9780141186672
  • Imprint: Peng. Mod. Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 256
  • RRP: $19.99

About the Author

Philip K. Dick

Philip Kendred Dick was born in Chicago in 1928, but lived most of his life in California, briefly attending the University of California at Berkeley in 1947. Among the most prolific and eccentric of SF writers, Dick's many novels and stories all blend a sharp and quirky imagination with a strong sense of the surreal.

By the time of his death in 1982 he had written 36 science fiction novels and 112 short stories. Notable titles amongst the novels include The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1965), Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968, later used as the basis for the film Blade Runner), Ubik (1969) and A Scanner Darkly (1977). The Man in the High Castle (1962), perhaps his most painstakingly constructed and chilling novel, won a Hugo Award in 1963.

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