> Skip to content
About the book
  • Published: 1 June 2009
  • ISBN: 9780099529941
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 144
  • RRP: $14.99

The Heart Of A Dog




A superb comic masterpiece and fierce parable of the Russian Revolution by the author of The Master and Margarita.

WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION BY ANDREY KURKOV

A rich, successful Moscow professor befriends a stray dog and attempts a scientific first by transplanting into it the testicles and pituitary gland of a recently deceased man. A distinctly worryingly human animal is now on the loose, and the professor's hitherto respectable life becomes a nightmare beyond endurance. An absurd and superbly comic story, this classic novel can also be read as a fierce parable of the Russian Revolution.

  • Pub date: 1 June 2009
  • ISBN: 9780099529941
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 144
  • RRP: $14.99

About the Author

Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (1891 - 1940) was born and educated in Kiev where he graduated as a doctor in 1916, but gave up the practice of medicine in 1920 to devote himself to literature. In 1925 he completed the satirical novella The Heart of a Dog, which remained unpublished in the Soviet Union until 1987. This was one of the many defeats he was to suffer at the hands of his censors. By 1930 Bulgakov had become so frustrated by the political atmosphere and the suppression of his works that he wrote to Stalin begging to be allowed to emigrate if he was not to be given the opportunity to make his living as a writer in the USSR. Stalin telephoned him personally and offered to arrange a job for him at the Moscow Arts Theatre instead. In 1938, a year before contracting a fatal illness, he completed his prose masterpiece, The Master and Margarita. He died in 1940. In 1966-7, thanks to the persistance of his widow, the novel made a first, incomplete, appearance in Moskva, and in 1973 appeared in full.

Also by Mikhail Bulgakov

See all

Praise for The Heart Of A Dog

“A marvellous writer”

Michael Frayn

“Bulgakov here assaults the dour utilitarian lives of Soviet citizens with a defiant, boisterous display of nonsense”

The Times

“As high-spirited as it is pointed. Unlike so much satire, it has a splendid sense of fun”

Irish Times


Related titles