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About the book
  • Published: 1 February 2002
  • ISBN: 9780099287179
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 400
  • RRP: $19.99

The Dark Room

World War 2 Fiction




'An important book, a powerful commentary on the moral issues of the last century with the realisation that no one is completely blameless . . . Extraordinary' Sunday Express

The Dark Room tells the stories of three ordinary Germans: Helmut, a young photographer in Berlin in the 1930s who uses his craft to express his patriotic fervour; Lore, a 12-year-old girl who in 1945 guides her young siblings across a devastated Germany after her Nazi parents are seized by the Allies; and, 50 years later, Micha, a young teacher obsessed with what his loving grandfather did in the war, struggling to deal with the past of his family and his country.

  • Pub date: 1 February 2002
  • ISBN: 9780099287179
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 400
  • RRP: $19.99

About the Author

Rachel Seiffert

The daughter of an Australian father and a German mother, Rachel Seiffert was born in Oxford and later moved to London. Her novel The Dark Room was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She has also written an acclaimed collection of short stories, Field Study.

Also by Rachel Seiffert

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Praise for The Dark Room

“A startlingly powerful debut . Not to be missed”

Daily Mail

“explores the experience of "ordinary" Germans-the descendants of Nazis and Nazi sympathizers-and poses questions about the country's psychological and political inheritance with rare insight and humanity.”

New Yorker

“Ambitious and powerful. Seiffert writes lean, clean prose. Deftly, she hangs large ideas on the vivid private experiences of her principal characters. poignant - and ultimately optimistic. clever and engrossing”

New York Times

“A stunning trilogy of linked stories about the Holocaust. Seiffert's book reminds me of Bernard Schlink's The Reader, but unlike that fascinating and intellectually provocative discussion about complicity and collective guilt, The Dark Room never veers away from its fictional roots... It doesn't read like a first novel.”

Toronto Globe and Mail

“excellent. a very readable, imaginative attempt to hold essential truths in living memory.”

Economist

“.It should be on everyone's reading lists.”

Sunday Times


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