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About the book
  • Published: 18 June 2019
  • ISBN: 9781785152115
  • Imprint: William Heinemann
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 160
  • RRP: $29.99
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Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters; Seymour - an Introduction




A Note from the Publisher: In honour of the centennial of the birth of J.D. Salinger in 1919, we have reissued all four of his books in commemorative hardback, with jacket designs based on the artwork and text of the very first Salinger editions, published in the 1950s and 1960s.

A Note from the Author: The two long pieces in this book originally came out in The New Yorker – RAISE HIGH THE ROOF BEAM, CARPENTERS in 1955, SEYMOUR – An Introduction in 1959. Whatever their differences in mood or effect, they are both very much concerned with Seymour Glass, who is the main character in my series about the Glass family. Oddly, the joys and satisfactions of working on the Glass family peculiarly increase and deepen for me with the years. I can’t say why, though. Not, at least, outside the casino proper of my fiction.


‘The Glasses are one of the liveliest, funniest, most fully-realized families in all of fiction’ Charles McGrath, New York Times

  • Pub date: 18 June 2019
  • ISBN: 9781785152115
  • Imprint: William Heinemann
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 160
  • RRP: $29.99

About the Author

J.D. Salinger

J.D. SALINGER (1919-2010) was born in New York City. His stories appeared in many magazines, most notably the New Yorker. Between 1951 and 1963 he published four book-length works of fiction – The Catcher in the Rye; For Esme with Love and Squalor; Franny and Zooey; and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction – that have been embraced and celebrated throughout the world, and have been credited with instilling in many a lifelong love of reading.

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Praise for Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters; Seymour - an Introduction

“His work meant a lot to me when I was a young person and his writing still sings.”

Dave Eggers

“It was a very pure voice he had. There was no one like him”

Martin Amis

“He was the poet of youthful alienation before youth really knew what that was”

Sunday Times


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