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  • Published: 1 November 2011
  • ISBN: 9781742750217
  • Imprint: Ebury Australia
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 512
  • RRP: $34.99
Categories:

Peter Pan




A wonderful, forgotten racing story set in The Great Depression

In 1932, they said there would never be another Phar Lap. Yet within months there came a racehorse so wildly brilliant that he was instantly compared to the dead champion. He was Peter Pan. Within months of Phar Lap's death, Peter Pan had won the Melbourne Cup and then two years later, won it again - the first horse in 72 years to take home a second. The newspapers of the day called him a 'superhorse' and declared 'another Phar Lap takes the stage.' But over the long years, Australia forgot their new champion. Peter Pan: The Forgotten Story of Phar Lap's Successor is the tale of the horse that came next - the brilliant, speedy Peter Pan. Casting off the shadow of Phar Lap, this tells the story of triumph during the Great Depression and the coming of a champion when Australia least expected one. It is time to restore the standing of our other great racing hero.

  • Published: 1 November 2011
  • ISBN: 9781742750217
  • Imprint: Ebury Australia
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 512
  • RRP: $34.99
Categories:

About the author

Jessica Owers

Jessica Owers is the author of the heralded Peter Pan: The Forgotten Story of Phar Lap’s Successor, winner of the 2012 Bill Whittaker Award for Best Racing Book in Australia. Her writing has appeared in Inside Breeding, The Thoroughbred, Breeding & Racing and Outback magazines, along with numerous other racing books and publications. She holds a combined honours degree from the University of Stirling, and has worked as a sub-editor in publishing and a riding instructor. She lives in Sydney’s eastern beaches with her husband, restaurateur Maurizio Lombardo.

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Praise for Peter Pan

In this new book...Owers tells us an exciting story involving the horse, its owners and the Racing characters of the time. Her description of the races and events are told as if she there to witness them. It is a tribute to her writing skills that she is able to do this. You won't find stories about our current day races described as clearly as Owers details the events of the far past.

Garry Robinson, Winform

[Jessica Ower's] writing is delightfully descriptive and while the her novel will in the main appeal to those with an interest in the sport, once a year punters who delve into its pages will not be disappointed.

Anya Whitlaw, Western Advocate

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