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About the book
  • Published: 1 July 2003
  • ISBN: 9780224064408
  • Imprint: Jonathan Cape
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 160
  • RRP: $39.99

Persepolis

The Story of a Childhood


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Another astonishing work of graphic non-fiction, the story of a girl growing up in Iran during the Revolution

Wise, often funny, sometimes heartbreaking, Persepolis tells the story of Marjane Satrapi's life in Tehran from the ages of six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken child of radical Marxists, and the great-grandaughter of Iran's last emperor, Satrapi bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.
Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Amidst the tragedy, Marjane's child's eye view adds immediacy and humour, and her story of a childhood at once outrageous and ordinary, beset by the unthinkable and yet buffered by an extraordinary and loving family, is immensely moving. It is also very beautiful; Satrapi's drawings have the power of the very best woodcuts.

  • Pub date: 1 July 2003
  • ISBN: 9780224064408
  • Imprint: Jonathan Cape
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 160
  • RRP: $39.99

About the Author

Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including the New Yorker and the New York Times. She is the author of several children's books, as well as the critically acclaimed and internationally bestselling memoir Persepolis, which has been translated into twelve languages, and was awarded the first Fernando Bueso Blanco Peace Prize in Spain. Her other books include Embroideries and Chicken With Plums.

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Praise for Persepolis

“The magic of Marjane Satrapi's work is that it can condense a whole country's tragedy into one poignant, funny scene after another.”

Natasha Walter, Independent on Sunday

“Persepolis is a stylish, clever and moving weapon of mass destruction.”

David Jenkins, Sunday Telegraph

“This touching, funny, illuminating memoir deserves a much wider audience.”

Kate Figes, Guardian


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