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About the book
  • Published: 1 August 2012
  • ISBN: 9780099541325
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 80
  • RRP: $12.99

Mrs Dalloway's Party

A Short Story Sequence




A beautifully jacketed collection of seven Virginia Woolf short stories, all written around the theme of parties and brought back into print for the first time in 40 years.

Mrs Dalloway's Party is a forgotten classic, and an enchanting piece of work by one of our most acclaimed twentieth century writers. A sequence of seven short stories that were written by Woolf in the same period as Mrs Dalloway - the opening story in the collection was originally intended to be the first chapter of the novel - they beautifully showcase the author's fascination with parties and with all the emotions and anxieties which surround these social occasions. In 'The New Dress' a nervous young woman frets that her fellow guests are laughing at her yellow silk dress while 'Together and Apart' explores what happens to two people meeting for the first time in Clarissa Dalloway's drawing room.

In this collection of stories Virginia Woolf created a microcosm of society out of the excitement, the fluctuations of mood and temper and the heightened emotions of the party.

  • Pub date: 1 August 2012
  • ISBN: 9780099541325
  • Imprint: Vintage Classics
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 80
  • RRP: $12.99

About the Author

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf was born in London in 1882. After her father's death in 1904 Virginia and her sister, the painter Vanessa Bell, moved to Bloomsbury and became the centre of ‘The Bloomsbury Group’. This informal collective of artists and writers exerted a powerful influence over early twentieth-century British culture.

In 1912 Virginia married Leonard Woolf, a writer and social reformer. Three years later, her first novel The Voyage Out was published, followed by Night and Day (1919) and Jacob's Room (1922). Between 1925 and 1931 Virginia Woolf produced what are now regarded as her finest masterpieces, from Mrs Dalloway (1925) to The Waves (1931). She also maintained an astonishing output of literary criticism, short fiction, journalism and biography. On 28 March 1941, a few months before the publication of her final novel, Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf committed suicide.

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Praise for Mrs Dalloway's Party

“Full of insightful monologues about human frailty, these stories are a stand-alone delight worth investigating”

Stylist

“Mesmerising”

Val Hennessey, Daily Mail


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