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  • Published: 1 September 2010
  • ISBN: 9781407022024
  • Imprint: BBC Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288
Categories:

In the Danger Zone



The story behind Stefan Gates' extraordinary culinary journey to the world's most dangerous and difficult places.

Award-winning food writer Stefan Gates has travelled the world to investigate how people cook, eat and survive in extreme conditions for the acclaimed BBC television series Cooking in the Danger Zone. He drank radioactive wine with babushkas in Chernobyl, ate fat-tailed sheep with Taliban warlords in Afghanistan, yak's penis with Chinese Communists, civet cat with the Karen rebels deep in the Burmese jungle and rotting walrus with the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic.

In this book Stefan takes us on an extraordinary personal journey as he tries to understand a world in crisis, and meets people caught up in war, poverty and environmental disasters. This behind-the-scenes account is hugely entertaining and thought provoking, blending war and food, ethics and emotions, comedy and tragedy.

  • Published: 1 September 2010
  • ISBN: 9781407022024
  • Imprint: BBC Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288
Categories:

About the author

Stefan Gates

Stefan Gates is a writer and broadcaster. In 2004, as a presenter and writer of the BBC2 series Full on Food, Stefan introduced the nation to the wilder side of gastronomy. His book Gastronaut, published the following year, won the Gormand World Cookbook Award for best Food Literature Book, as well as being shortlisted for the Guild of Food Writers' Award. Stefan has worked as a TV director, scriptwriter and comedy producer, but his strangest job was appearing naked on the cover of Led Zeppelin's Houses of the Holy at the age of four. He is married to the top food photographer Georgia Glynn Smith, who shot the pictures for Gastronaut.

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Praise for In the Danger Zone

Consistently engaging... Terrific reportage: thoughtful, unpatronising and gently provocative

Guardian

Fascinating

Sunday Times

What could be grotesque and patronising turns out to be informative and occasionally shocking ... A kind of antidote to the mundanity of the rest of culinary TV.

Mail on Sunday

An insane idea, but a fascinating film

Daily Telegraph

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