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  • Published: 1 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446441039
  • Imprint: Cornerstone Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 304

How To Be Lost




'Lovely...it has that lovely tone that only American women writers seem to be able to achieve' Nick Hornby

[How to Be Lost] invites comparison to The Lovely Bones.' People Magazine

To their neighbours in suburban Holt, New York, the Winters family has it all: a grand home, a trio of radiant daughters and a sense of security in their affluent corner of America.But when five-year-old Ellie disappears, the fault lines within the Winters family are exposed.

Fifteen years later, Caroline, now a New Orleans cocktail waitress, sees a photograph of a woman in People Magazine. Convinced that it is Ellie all grown up, Caroline embarks on a search for her missing sister. As she travels through the New Mexico desert, the mountains of Colorado, and the smoky underworld of Montana, she devotes herself to salvaging her broken family.

How To Be Lost is a spellbinding novel about sisters, family secrets - and love.

  • Published: 1 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446441039
  • Imprint: Cornerstone Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 304

About the author

Amanda Eyre Ward

Amanda Eyre Ward is the author of the critically acclaimed and award-winning novel Sleep Toward Heaven. The New York Post named Ward one of five Writers to Watch in 2003.

Also by Amanda Eyre Ward

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Praise for How To Be Lost

'The narrative is so engrossing, so propelling, you're surprised to come upon the last page...a damn good story.'

Time Out New York

'A walloping knockout of a finisher that would seem like a cheap trick if it weren't so thrilling. The author plays a smooth game, not showing her hand until the absolute right time.'

Kirkus

'This is one of those sink-your-teeth-into-it novels that reminds you why you loved to read in the first place.'

The Charlotte Observer

'I read Amanda Eyre Ward's lovely How To Be Lost after a warm recommendation from a friend...it has that lovely tone that only American women writers seem to be able to achieve: melancholic, wry, apparently (but only apparently) artless, perched on the balls of its feet and ready to jump either towards humour or heartbreak, with no run-up and no effort. How To Be Lost has a great setup, too.' Nick Hornby

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