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  • Published: 24 December 2012
  • ISBN: 9781473557840
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 104

Grandville




The first instalment of Bryan Talbot's anthropomorphic steam-punk thriller

In Grandville, the first volume in the series, Talbot brings us a steampunk masterpiece. IIt tells the story of detective Inspector LeBrock of Scotland Yard as he stalks a gang of murderers through the heart of Belle Epoque Paris. In this alternative reality France is the major world power and its capital throngs with steam-driven hansom cabs, automatons and flying machines. The characters are mostly animals, though there is an underclass of humans, often referred to as 'dough faces'.

Visually stunning, Grandville is a fantastical and audacious rollercoaster ride that will add to Talbot's reputation as one of the best graphic novelists in the world.

  • Published: 24 December 2012
  • ISBN: 9781473557840
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 104

About the author

Bryan Talbot

Bryan Talbot was born in 1952. He has worked on underground comics, science fiction and superhero stories such as Judge Dredd and Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight. His books include Alice in Sunderland, Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes (with Mary Talbot), the first graphic novel to win the Costa biography award, and the Grandville series.

Also by Bryan Talbot

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Praise for Grandville

A solid conspiracy caper with bursts of Tarantino-like mayhem...a witty romp in a vividly realised topsy-turvy world.

Times Literary Supplement

Utterly delightful...It's a playful, allusive book in which there's a witty touch or deliciously knowing in-joke on almost every page...beautifully rendered, throughout, the glossy gorgeousness fills your eyes.

The Times

A gorgeously coloured steampunk fantasy.

Metro

Think Wind In The Willows meets 1920s film noir, a combination you never knew you needed… From political conspiracies to serial killings, this is all set in an alternate present day where Britain lost the Napoleonic Wars and the entire Royal Family were executed... It’s a really compelling setting for any story, but the detective mystery element brings it all together. To me, this is perfect fodder for a Wes Anderson-style stop-motion film series. It’s funny, eerie, and altogether very surreal.

Megan McGill, Den of Geek

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