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  • Published: 14 December 2021
  • ISBN: 9781473570641
  • Imprint: Ebury Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288

Everyday Trauma

Overcoming daily stress, anxiety and painful memories




The simple 8-week, science-based method to overcome trauma from distinguished Rutgers University neuroscientist professor Tracey Shors

Difficult experiences are unavoidable; transform your resilience in three simple steps.

Contrary to long-held belief, trauma is not only caused by exposure to a single, extreme event. The cumulative effect of common stressors that we encounter in our day-to-day lives can have an equally significant impact on our mental and physical well-being. From difficult childhoods, to bereavements, pregnancy and childbirth, and even stressful jobs, traumas - both large and small - are a part of life we can't control, but we can change the way we respond to them.

In Everyday Trauma, distinguished neuroscientist Dr Tracey Shors draws on over thirty years of research to explain how your mind and body responds to trauma and how you can take control. Her science-based, three-step method is designed to help you process any kind of personal trauma from your past, reverse your symptoms and strengthen your resilience for stressors in your future. Its beauty is in its simplicity; by practicing her three simple mental and physical steps in combination twice a week, research has shown you can reduce the ruminative thoughts that trauma so often leaves us with, and avoid the trap of ongoing mental struggles such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and PTSD.

Whether you can access formal therapy or not, in this important book Dr Tracey Shors has provided the tools for you to help yourself through traumas in your past, present and future. No matter what life throws at you, you can take positive steps to heal your mind for a better life.

  • Published: 14 December 2021
  • ISBN: 9781473570641
  • Imprint: Ebury Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 288

About the author

Tracey Shors

Dr Tracey Shors is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers University, where a primary goal of her research is to translate neuroscientific laboratory findings into practical interventions to help people recover from anxiety, depression, chronic stress, trauma and PTSD, especially PTSD related to sexual violence.
She has spent over 30 years studying how stress and trauma affect the brain, as well as the thoughts and memories it generates. Her research has been published in some of the most prestigious journals, including Nature, Science, Journal of Neuroscience, Royal Academy of Sciences, and Scientific American. For more information visit www.maptrainmybrain.com.

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