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  • Published: 2 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446472903
  • Imprint: Cornerstone Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 400

Crooked Talk

Five Hundred Years of the Language of Crime



Britain's expert on slang looks at the language of crime

The language of crime has a long and venerable history - in fact, the first collection of words specifically used by criminals, Hye-Way to the Spittel House, dates from as early as 1531. Jonathon Green is our national expert on slang, and in Crooked Talk he looks at five hundred years of crooks and conmen - from the hedge-creepers and counterfeit cranks of the sixteenth century to the blaggers and burners of the twenty-first - as well as the swag, the hideouts, the getaway vehicles and the 'tools of the trade'. Not to mention a substantial detour into the world of prisons that faced those unlucky enough to be caught by the boys in blue.

If you have ever wondered when the police were first referred to as pigs, why prison guards became known as redraws, or what precisely the subtle art of dipology involves, then this book has all the answers.

  • Published: 2 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446472903
  • Imprint: Cornerstone Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 400

About the author

Jonathon Green

Jonathon Green is the author of the Cassell Dictionary of Slang (1998) and Green's Dictionary of Slang (2010), for which he was awarded the 2012 Dartmouth Medal for the most outstanding reference work of the year. He has also written a history of lexicography, Chasing the Sun (1996), the legendary oral history of the British counterculture, Days in the Life (1988), several other oral histories and All Dressed Up: The Sixties and the Counterculture (1998). He lives in London and Paris.

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Praise for Crooked Talk

Pretty much anybody would like this book... Excellent on every aspect of crime.

Evening Standard

Wickedly entertaining

Daily Mail

Bursting with quiz-worthy revelations

Robert McCrum, Observer

A comprehensive and entertaining guide to the language of law-breaking

History Today

As gripping as any novel ... I'd recommend it to anyone who uses language or is interested in his fellow human-beings

Michael Bywater, New Humanist

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