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About the book
  • Published: 21 May 2019
  • ISBN: 9781845951887
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 448
  • RRP: $45.00

Carrington's Letters

Her Art, Her Loves, Her Friendships




Bloomsbury disrobed: Carrington's beguiling and gleeful letters take us beyond Bloomsbury into discussion about sexual mores, how to be an artist, and what it is to be truly oneself

Carrington's beguiling letters take us beyond the Bloomsbury group to discuss sexual mores, how to be an artist, and what it is to be truly oneself.

Known only by her surname, Dora Carrington was the star of her year at the Slade School of Fine Art, and was friends with some of the greatest minds of her day, including Virginia Woolf, Rosamund Lehmann and Maynard Keynes.

For over a decade she was the companion of homosexual writer Lytton Strachey, and - stricken without him- killed herself when he died in 1932. Though she never achieved the fame her early career promised, in her determination to live life according to her own nature – especially in relation to her work and her fluid attitude to sex, gender and sexuality – she fought battles that remain familiar and urgent today.

Now, through her passionate, playful and honest letters, we can encounter the maverick artist and compelling personality afresh and in her own words.

  • Pub date: 21 May 2019
  • ISBN: 9781845951887
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Trade Paperback
  • Pages: 448
  • RRP: $45.00

About the Author

Dora Carrington

Dora Carrington was born in 1893 in Hereford. At seventeen she enrolled at the Slade School of Fine Art, part of an extraordinary generation of painters including Mark Gertler and Paul and John Nash. She painted her friends, her house, her animals, her furniture and designed jackets for books published by Virginia and Leonard Woolf’s Hogarth Press. She was the long-time companion of writer Lytton Strachey, though in 1921 she married Ralph Partridge, who joined her and Lytton in a largely harmonious ménage à trois. In 1932, after the death of Strachey to cancer, she committed suicide, aged thirty-eight.


Praise for Carrington's Letters

“Though Virginia and Vanessa, Clive and Bertie, Bunny and Roger all feature, this is much more than another tribute to the tribe”

Michael Bird, Daily Telegraph

“Chisholm’s masterstoke is to celebrate the letter as artwork… Letters are, of course, a site of aesthetic experiment and creativity, and to view them as such permits the artistry of the fragment to stand, enabling the collage collection to tell other stories of form and function”

Amber K. Regis, Times Literary Supplement


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