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  • Published: 31 March 2020
  • ISBN: 9780141990538
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • RRP: $24.99
Categories:

Bending Adversity

Japan And The Art Of Survival- Second Edition




A both definitive and highly enjoyable book on how modern Japan works - now fully updated to 2020 and the new 'Reiwa' Era.

Updated with a new chapter.

Despite years of stagnation, Japan remains one of the world's largest economies and a country which exerts a remarkable cultural fascination. David Pilling's new book is an entertaining, deeply knowledgeable and surprising analysis of a group of islands which have shown great resilience, both in the face of financial distress and when confronted with the overwhelming disaster of the 2011 earthquake and resulting tsunami. Bending Adversity is a superb work of reportage and the essential book even for those who already feel they know the country well.

  • Published: 31 March 2020
  • ISBN: 9780141990538
  • Imprint: Penguin Press
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • RRP: $24.99
Categories:

Praise for Bending Adversity

A superb book that, better than any other I have read, manages to get the reader inside the skin of Japanese society . . . astutely observed . . . a great read brimming with insights

Japan Times

If you had time only for one book on Japan, you should start and finish with Pilling's

Edward Luce, author of The Retreat of Western Liberalism

Whether writing about the bubble and its aftermath, persistent deflation, or the Tohoku earthquake and Fukushima nuclear disaster, Pilling uses individual stories to starkly reveal the truth about Japan

Ryu Murakami

Pilling wants to rescue Japan from the standard one-dimensional images of the country . . . read this book and find that Japan is a much more interesting and engaging place, for all its flaws

Bill Emmott, Literary Review

Hugely enjoyable and perceptive . . . places the denunciations of two allegedly "lost decades" in the context of what the country is really like

Chris Patten, Financial Times

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