> Skip to content
About the book
  • Published: 1 July 2010
  • ISBN: 9781409077275
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 272
Categories:

Annapurna

The First Conquest of an 8000-Metre Peak




One of the great works of mountaineering literature introduced by Joe Simpson.

`After being swept off his feet by an avalanche and left dangling by a rope around his neck, Herzog``began to pass water, violently and uncontrollably'. Your reaction may be only slightly less extreme as you move from one nail-biting moment to the next in this wonderful 1952 tale of triumph and frostbite. Outside this is the enthralling account, by the leader of the French expedition, of the first conquest of Annapurna- at that time, and at more than 8000 metres, the highest mountain ever climbed. The 26 plates also provide a remarkable photographic record of the adventure.

  • Pub date: 1 July 2010
  • ISBN: 9781409077275
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 272
Categories:

About the Author

Maurice Herzog

The distinguished French mountaineer Maurice Herzog was leader of the 1950 expedition to Annapurna. He was one of the two climbers to reach the summit.


Praise for Annapurna

“After being swept off his feet by an avalanche and left dangling by a rope around his neck, Herzog``began to pass water, violently and uncontrollably'. Your reaction may be only slightly less extreme as you move from one nail-biting moment to the next in this wonderful 1952 tale of triumph and frostbite.”

Outside

“Quite simply the greatest mountaineering book ever written.”

Joe Simpson, from the Introduction

“Those who have never seen the Himalayas...will know that they have been a companion of greatness”

New York Times Book Review

“The climb took place before the Himalayas were a tourist attraction and before Gore-Tex cold-weather gear was available in Marks & Spencer. They had no oxygen, little food and on the descent Herzog lost his gloves, got trapped in a storm, was buried in an avalanche and became frostbitten. His descriptions don't stint on the details of maggot-ridden flesh and amputations without anaesthesia”

Richard Eyre


Related titles