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An Evening of Long Goodbyes
  • Published: 5 August 2004
  • ISBN: 9780141942032
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 480

An Evening of Long Goodbyes



Big, comic, literary-commercial first novel from a young and promotable author.

Acclaimed as one of the funniest and most assured Irish novels of recent years, An Evening of Long Goodbyes is the story of Dubliner Charles Hythloday and the heroic squandering of the family inheritance. Featuring drinking, greyhound racing, vanishing furniture, more drinking, old movies, assorted Dublin lowlife, eviction and the perils of community theatre, Paul Murray's debut novel is a tour de force of comedic writing wrapped in an honest-to-goodness tale of a man- and a family - living in denial . . .

  • Published: 5 August 2004
  • ISBN: 9780141942032
  • Imprint: Penguin eBooks
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 480

About the author

Paul Murray

Date: 2005-01-07
Paul Murray, a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, is a writer and diplomat who has served in London, Tokyo, Ottawa, New York and Seoul. His biography, A Fantastic Journey: The Life and Literature of Lafcadio Hearn (1993), won the Koizumi Yakumo Literary Prize (Japan) in 1995. He has published and lectured in Europe, the USA and Asia.

Paul Murray was born in 1975. He studied English literature at Trinity College in Dublin. He has a Masters degree in creative writing at the University of East Anglia. Paul was a former bookseller. An Evening of Long Goodbyes was shortlisted for the Whitbread First Novel Award in 2003 and was nominated for the Kerry Irish Fiction Award. Skippy Dies was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Costa Best Novel Award. 

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Praise for An Evening of Long Goodbyes

A freewheeling adventure through modern Dublin. Hilarious, rich and satisfying

Times Literary Supplement

A sheer triumph

Ali Smith

Innately entertaining. The plot scuttles along with Wodehouse-like delirium

Time Out

Every joke, every observation, every name reverberates with playful nuance and nervy significance; the end result is a gleeful tweak of the New Ireland's proud nose

LA Times

One of the most entertaining and laugh-out-loud Irish yarns of recent years with a stack of one-liners any stand-up comedian would kill for. Quite hilarious

Irish Independent

Hugely original and funny. Nothing quite like it has been written before. Its wordplay and knockabout farce has a depth rare in humorous writing

Sunday Times

Daft, engaging, always thoroughly likeable . . . a writer of great talent

Evening Herald