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  • Published: 2 November 2004
  • ISBN: 9780451529589
  • Imprint: Signet
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $9.99

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court




Mark Twain moves from broad comedy to biting social satire in this literary classic. Cracked on the head by a crowbar in nineteenth-century Connecticut, Hank Morgan wakes to find himself in King Arthur’s England. After using his knoweldge of an upcoming solar eclipse to escape a death sentence, Hank must then navigate his way through a medieval world whose idyllic surface masks fear, injustice, and ignorance.

Considered by H. L. Mencken to be “the most bitter critic of American platitude and delusion…that ever lived,” Twain enchants readers with a Camelot that strikes disturbingly contemporary notes in this acclaimed tour de force that encompasses both the pure joy of wild high jinks and deeply probing insights into the nature of man.  With an Introduction by Leland Krauth And an Afterword by Edmund Reiss

  • Published: 2 November 2004
  • ISBN: 9780451529589
  • Imprint: Signet
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $9.99

About the author

Mark Twain

Mark Twain's real name was Sam Clemens, and he was born in 1835 in a small town on the Mississippi, one of seven children. He smoked cigars at the age of eight, and aged nine he stowed away on a steamboat. He left school at 11 and worked at a grocery store, a bookstore, a blacksmith's and a newspaper, where he was allowed to write his own stories (not all of them true). He then worked on a steamboat, where he got the name 'Mark Twain' (from the call given by the boat's pilot when their boat is in safe waters). Eventually he turned to journalism again, travelled round the world, and began writing books which became very popular. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are his most famous novels. He poured the money he earned from writing into new business ventures and crazy inventions, such as a clamp to stop babies throwing off their bed covers, a new boardgame, and a hand grenade full of extinguishing liquid to throw on a fire. With his shock of white hair and trademark white suit Mark Twain became the most famous American writer in the world. He died in 1910.

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Praise for A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

“Twain is the funniest literary American writer…[I]t must have been a great pleasure to be him.”—George Saunders

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