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About the book
  • Published: 30 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446483916
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 72

Still Life In Milford




The new collection from the author of the cult classic THE UNDERTAKING

In Still Life in Milford, Lynch tenders poems on life and death, history and memory, the local and the larger geographies. Examining the dynamics of faith, rememberance, and intimate conduct, these poems are informed by end times, tribulations and visions that make up the ordinary enterprise of daily life. Colloquy and narrative, Soliloquy and tribute: Still Life in Milford engages the poet's voice - as elegist, eulogist, obiturist, straight man and passer-by - to achieve a difficult and inimitable harmony.

  • Pub date: 30 June 2011
  • ISBN: 9781446483916
  • Imprint: Vintage Digital
  • Format: EBook
  • Pages: 72

About the Author

Thomas Lynch

Thomas Lynch is the award winning author of three collections of poems and three books of nonfiction, including The Undertaking - Life Studies from the Dismal Trade. His work has appeared in the Atlantic and New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, and Paris Review. His commentaries have appeared in the New York Times, the Irish Times and The Times and are regularly broadcast on the BBC, RTE and NPR. He lives in Milford, Michigan, and Moveen, West Clare.

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Praise for Still Life In Milford

“With one ear to the ground and another to the heavens, Lynch renders poems that echo mortality's solid thud.”

Publisher's Weekly

“Thomas Lynch's Still Life in Milford is an impressive addition to a body of work already noted for its rich, humane recording of "the everyday mysteries" of life and its passing. Beginning with a meditation on the closeness and intimacy between art and memory, life and death, Lynch pursues these themes through colloquy and narrative, soliloquy and tribute. "Recollections of / the dead, the dying and the grown or gone" dominate the book, as do reflections on how the "ineluctable modalities" of the dead remain as presences in "the lives we live" ("Morveen Notebook"). Adapting stories from his life as undertaker in Milford, Michigan, and painful personal testimony, Lynch--without irony--questions the use of contrived word and ritual in our denials of death and the dead. Rarely sentimental, these poems are particularly evocative when questioning the power, privilege, and legitimacy of poetry to ever come face to face with grief without falling into a stylised, elegiac formula for denoting how the dead are remembered. Acknowledging, in one poem that "love and grieving share the one body", Lynch is also disturbingly precise about the deepest, most private, unsayable conversations we have with the dead which "leave the heart broken" ("Iambs for the Day of Burial").”

David Marriott, Amazon.co.uk Review


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