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Vintage Past: Inventive tales of times gone by to tell the histories we think we know

Reunion is a little-known novel. But it is also a universal story of friendship. It is a book of great power, waiting to be discovered.

On a grey afternoon in 1932, a Stuttgart classroom is stirred by the arrival of a newcomer. Middle-class Hans is intrigued by the aristocratic new boy, Konradin, and before long they become best friends. It’s a friendship of the greatest kind, of shared interests and long conversations, of hikes in the German hills and growing up together. But the boys live in a changing Germany. Powerful, delicate and daring, Reunion is a story of the fragility, and strength, of the bonds between friends.

WITH AN AFTERWORD BY RACHEL SEIFFERT

Reviews

A brilliant work of art that deserves a far wider readership

Ian McEwan

Shimmers above so much of the new fiction….captures … an untainted idealism that brings a lump to the throat in its final line

Arifa Akbar, Independent

I loved Reunion and found it very moving. It’s a rediscovered novella, only 80 pages long, a real gem about how friendship can be challenged by historical circumstance

John Boyne

I read it in a gulp...very powerful

Deborah Moggach

Finely concise, tender and most painful

Sunday Times

I think if I had to agitate for one under-mentioned title it would probably be Reunion... Maybe readers think they have read the story before. But I urge you to give it a try; it is short, and moving. I know that’s not the same as stumbling across it somewhere in the stacks...but perhaps it can qualify as a treasure all the same

Paris Review

From the first tingle-making line...I was mesmerised by Uhlman’s heart-breaking story

Daily Mail

An exquisite novella such as Fred Uhlman's Reunion...is clearly worth much more than its weight or cover price and certainly more than the latest prize-winning bit of puff

Guardian

Melancholy and elegiac with a very effective final twist of the plot

The Times

The interesting question now is what is the “greatest book we’ve never heard of” (Stoner’s tag)? Fred Uhlman’s Reunion (1971), to be published in July, might follow in Stoner’s footsteps... Watch this space

Independent

A minor masterpiece. Uhlman succeeds in lending his narrative a musical quality which is both haunting and lyrical

Arthur Koestler

A profound meditation upon the nature of friendship. The first line alone is enough to send a tingle up your spine: 'He came into my life in February 1932 and never left it again'

Guardian

A book that changed me? Reunion by Fred Uhlman. I read it 20 years ago. It changed my view on Judaism

Jeffrey Archer

Originally published in 1971, apparently, Reunion passed me by then but reading it now it certainly packs a punch

Guy Pringle, Nudge

A little masterpiece

Val Hennessy, Daily Mail

I loved the mood of the book — it’s nostalgic and wistful without being sentimental — and it’s written in a perfectly matter-of-fact way but is done so eloquently the sentences feel as if they’ve been spun from silk. It’s a quick read, too, but it’s the kind of story that stays with you

Reading Matters

Devastating

Fiona Wilson, The Times

Never hits a false note

i (The paper for today)

It’s a good novel, a short novel, quickly and easily read, but it’s a novel that demonstrates Uhlman’s great skill because when you arrive at the last sentence (the very last sentence of the novel), you see you’ve actually missed a different arc entirely. It is this twist in the tail that has you both retreating back through the book but also (curse them) recommending it to others as well

Book Munch

Extraordinary…one of literature’s most shattering final sentences

New York Times

I loved Reunion and found it very moving. It’s a rediscovered novella, only 80 pages long, a real gem about how friendship can be challenged by historical circumstance

John Boyne

The interesting question now is what is the “greatest book we’ve never heard of” (Stoner’s tag)? Fred Uhlman’s Reunion (1971), to be published in July, might follow in Stoner’s footsteps... Watch this space

Independent

I think if I had to agitate for one under-mentioned title it would probably be Reunion... Maybe readers think they have read the story before. But I urge you to give it a try; it is short, and moving. I know that’s not the same as stumbling across it somewhere in the stacks...but perhaps it can qualify as a treasure all the same

Paris Review

Melancholy and elegiac with a very effective final twist of the plot

The Times

Finely concise, tender and most painful

Sunday Times

I read it in a gulp...very powerful

Deborah Moggach

From the first tingle-making line...I was mesmerised by Uhlman’s heart-breaking story

Daily Mail

A minor masterpiece. Uhlman succeeds in lending his narrative a musical quality which is both haunting and lyrical

Arthur Koestler

An exquisite novella such as Fred Uhlman's Reunion...is clearly worth much more than its weight or cover price and certainly more than the latest prize-winning bit of puff

Guardian

A profound meditation upon the nature of friendship. The first line alone is enough to send a tingle up your spine: 'He came into my life in February 1932 and never left it again'

Guardian

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Formats & editions

  • Paperback

    9781784871352

    November 28, 2016

    Vintage Classics

    96 pages

    RRP $14.99

    Online retailers

    • Abbey's Bookshop
    • Angus & Robertson Bookworld
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    • Collins Booksellers
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    • Books Kinokuniya
    • The Nile
    • QBD
    • Readings
    • Robinsons Bookshop
    Or

    Find your local bookstore at booksellers.org.au

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Reunion

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