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Once gripped by these terrifying Penguin Worlds titles, there’s no turning back.

What really scares you? A climate change-induced diaspora? Spooks in the night? Maybe your greatest fears lurk in the dark corners of the World Wide Web? From urban fantasy warfare to civilising a new planet, chilling hauntings to horrific and realistic visions of the future, each gripping book in the Penguin Worlds series offers ultimate escapism.
 

  • Roger Pollack is Mr Slippery, a computer hacker who inhabits the 'other plane' - where like-minded individuals penetrate the world's computers for profit or kicks.

  • Before she became a world-famous children's author E. Nesbit wrote for adults. She penned a great many ghost and horror stories, of which the very best are gathered here.

  • The sun wanes and a new ice age descends on the world. Swiftly, the old industrial nations die. Their populations flock to Africa or South America - wherever crops will grow and life is sustainable.

  • After an accident destroys their starship and leaves them stranded on an uncharted but apparently hospitable planet - crewless, with few supplies and without tools - the five female and three male passengers debate how to survive.

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