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About the book
  • Published: 6 October 2000
  • ISBN: 9780099267621
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $32.99
Categories:

Design For A Life

How Behaviour Develops


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How and why does each of us grow up to be the person we are? What role do genes play in shaping our behaviour and personalties? Are our characters fixed, or can we change as adults? How does early experience affect our sexual preferences? Why do children play/ These are all questions about behavourial development - the lifelong process of growth and change from conception to death that is central to an understanding of human nature . Written in clear and simple language this book offers an understanding of the science that lies behind many current controversies in parenting, education, social policy and medicine. The lucid syle, carefully chosen scientific examples and literary quotations make it both accessible and entertaining. DESIGN FOR A LIFE is a book about a cutting edge of scientific understanding that will speak to every reader.

  • Pub date: 6 October 2000
  • ISBN: 9780099267621
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $32.99

About the Authors

Patrick Bateson

Patrick Bateson is Emeritus Professor of Ethology (the biological study of behaviour) at Cambridge University, a fellow at King's College, Cambridge and a Fellow of the Royal Society. He has also been the provost of King's College, Cambridge and the Biological Secretary of the Royal Society. He received a BA in Zoology and a PhD in Animal Behaviour from Cambridge University, held a Harkness Fellowship at Stanford University and was Director of the the Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour at Cambridge for ten years. He has edited and co-edited several books, including Mate Choice (1983), The Development and Integration of Behaviour (1991), Behavioural Mechanisms in Evolutionary Perspective (1992) and the series Perspectives in Ethology.

Paul Martin

Paul Martin studied biology at Cambridge University, where he acquired a First in Natural Sciences and a PhD in behavioural biology; and at Stanford University, where he was a Harkness Fellow. He subsequently lectured and researched at Cambridge University. He is the co-author, with Patrick Bateson, of Measuring Behaviour (1993), and author of The Sickening Mind (1998).


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