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  • Published: 15 February 2011
  • ISBN: 9780552563529
  • Imprint: Young Corgi
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 80
  • RRP: $14.99

Connie & Rollo



A humourous tale from the master of animal stories Dick King-Smith

Connie Button amazes her parents when she begins to speak - somehow she can add up even the biggest numbers in her head! And when Rollo says HIS first words, they are all in rhyme. But will Connie's brainy tricks get her into trouble? And can Rollo live a life in verse?

  • Published: 15 February 2011
  • ISBN: 9780552563529
  • Imprint: Young Corgi
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 80
  • RRP: $14.99

About the author

Dick King-Smith

Dick King-Smith served in the Grenadier Guards during the Second World War, and afterwards spent twenty years as a farmer in Gloucestershire, the county of his birth. Many of his stories are inspired by his farming experiences. Later he taught at a village primary school. His first book, The Fox Busters, was published in 1978. He wrote a great number of children’s books, including The Sheep-Pig (winner of the Guardian Award and filmed as Babe), Harry’s Mad, Noah’s Brother, The Queen’s Nose, Martin’s Mice, Ace, The Cuckoo Child and Harriet’s Hare (winner of the Children’s Book Award in 1995). At the British Book Awards in 1991 he was voted Children’s Author of the Year. In 2009 he was made an OBE for services to children’s literature. Dick King-Smith died in 2011 at the age of eighty-eight. Discover more about Dick King-Smith at: dickkingsmith.com

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Praise for Connie & Rollo

Amusing tale

TES

The sheer daftness of the ideas will keep kids' attention clamped eagerly to every page

SHE Magazine

Dick King-Smith needs no introduction and these two tales will win new fans... Would be suitable for early independent readers - but adults won't mind having them read to them either

The School Libraria

The two stories work well together. Both include amusing incidents and comments likely to encourage children to think about their own lives. New readers should be able to read the text for themselves. It is clearly presented with a good number of helpful black and white illustrations. The stories are also good to read aloud to children aged about four to seven who should enjoy the strings of numbers, and rhymes like botty/potty and me/wee

The Junior Bookshelf

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