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  • Published: 1 February 2013
  • ISBN: 9780099555643
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 336
  • RRP: $22.99

HHhH




An astonishing, unforgettable novel: a thrilling Second World War assassination plot told with rare literary brilliance.

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

Two men have been enlisted to kill the head of the Gestapo. This is Operation Anthropoid, Prague, 1942: two Czechoslovakian parachutists sent on a daring mission by London to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich - chief of the Nazi secret services, 'the hangman of Prague', 'the blond beast', 'the most dangerous man in the Third Reich'. His boss is Heinrich Himmler but everyone in the SS says 'Himmler's brain is called Heydrich', which in German spells HHhH.

HHhH is a panorama of the Third Reich told through the life of one outstandingly brutal man, a story of unbearable heroism and loyalty, revenge and betrayal. It is a moving and shattering work of fiction.
Laurent Binet's highly anticipated new novel, The Seventh Function of Language, is available for pre-order now...

  • Published: 1 February 2013
  • ISBN: 9780099555643
  • Imprint: Vintage
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 336
  • RRP: $22.99

About the author

Laurent Binet

Laurent Binet lives and works in France. His first novel, HHhH, was an international bestseller which won the prestigious Prix Goncourt du premier roman, among other prizes.

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Praise for HHhH

Vividly recreates the assassination of Heydrich and its consequences

John Le Carré, Telegraph

Laurent Binet’s HHhH is hard to categorise. All is can say is that it has the same gravity-defying balance of weight and light as early Milan Kundera

Janice Turner, The Times

Utterly amazing ... likely to make you gasp, laugh and cry often within a few pages

Savidge Reads

A novel of great verve and originality… a heart-quickening climax and the undeserved satisfaction of feeling privy to what really happened

Strong Words

Binet provides both context and impressive detail on the eventual assassination of Heydrich

Mark Perryman, Philosophy Footbal

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