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The Light Trap
About the book
  • Published: 15 April 2002
  • ISBN: 9780224061773
  • Imprint: Jonathan Cape
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 96
  • RRP: $19.99

The Light Trap


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John Burnside's first book of poetry since the award-winning The Asylum Dance.

As the judges of the Whitbread Prize noted, 'Burnside's poems have the rare power to alter one's perception of the world and of language - a sensory delight with an epiphany on every page.' Once again, in this, his eighth collection of poetry, John Burnside is looking deeply into the ways we see our world: addressing the organic relationship between the environment and the unconscious, between ideas and creatures, in poems whose protagonists - from the deer who pass through a suburban garden to the poet's six-month-old son - are infinitely mysterious, difficult and 'out there'.

These are poems that move beyond the traditional idea of 'nature poetry', investigating the very basis of our knowledge, not only of living things, but of the play of gravity and light that makes our world and theirs possible. Resonant and luminous, this is a work of intimacy and wonder from one of Britain's most important poets.

  • Pub date: 15 April 2002
  • ISBN: 9780224061773
  • Imprint: Jonathan Cape
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 96
  • RRP: $19.99

About the Author

John Burnside

John Burnside is amongst the most acclaimed writers of his generation. His novels, short stories, poetry and memoirs have won numerous awards, including the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize, the Whitbread Poetry Award, the Encore Award and the Saltire Scottish Book of the Year. In 2011 he became only the second person to win both the Forward and T. S. Eliot Prizes for poetry for the same book, Black Cat Bone. In 2015 he was a judge for the Man Booker Prize. He is a Professor in the School of English at St Andrews University.

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Praise for The Light Trap

“If genius is operating anywhere in English poetry at present, I feel it is here, in Burnside's singular music.”

Adam Thorpe

“Dizzyingly beautiful.”

Daily Telegraph

“Beautiful and lyrical.”

Daily Mail


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