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  • Published: 3 September 2024
  • ISBN: 9781641294935
  • Imprint: Soho Press
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $49.99

The Devil Raises His Own



From the master of Western noir comes a provocatively entertaining crime saga set in the early days of the film industry.

This dark historical adventure captures the beginnings of the Hollywood studio system and the “blue movie” industry that grows up alongside it.

From the master of Western noir comes a provocatively entertaining crime saga set in the early days of the film industry.

This dark historical adventure captures the beginnings of the Hollywood studio system and the “blue movie” industry that grows up alongside it.

Los Angeles, 1916: Photographer Bill Ogden has opened a portrait studio in the seedy noir world of early Hollywood, where he is joined by his granddaughter, Flavia—a woman in need of a fresh start after bludgeoning her drunken, abusive husband to death in Wichita. Though his business is mainly legit, Bill finds himself brushing up against the “blue movie” porn industry growing in the shadows of the motion picture mainstream.

When a series of grisly murders take place across the city, Bill and his capable granddaughter are pulled into events as tricky and tangled as anything this side of The Big Sleep. We meet dreamers, opportunists, washed-up former stars and starry-eyed newcomers, a cast of unforgettable characters living on the margins looking to make a quick buck, launch a career, or just keep their family together. The Devil Raises His Own is at once a stripped-down noir thriller and a panoramic look at Los Angeles at the beginning of motion pictures—a Boogie Nights set in the era of D.W. Griffith and Charlie Chaplin from one of the best crime novelists working today.

  • Published: 3 September 2024
  • ISBN: 9781641294935
  • Imprint: Soho Press
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 384
  • RRP: $49.99

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Praise for The Devil Raises His Own

Praise for Cottonwood

"[Phillips] writes about criminal behaviors . . . with wit and gusto . . . That Ogden stays unpredictable to the end is a tribute to [Phillips's] refusal to rewrite history and whitewash the hellions who built this nation."
—The New York Times Book Review