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  • Published: 8 March 2021
  • ISBN: 9781684057528
  • Imprint: IDW Publishing
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $79.99

Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 29



This last volume in the series completes the iconic comic series by Chester Gould. The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general.

After 46 years-two months-and-twentyone-days writing and drawing Dick Tracy Chester Gould retired at the age of 77. In these historic final strips, Gould pits his dynamic detective against the latest in a long line of grotesque villains--Pucker Puss, the hitman who literally spits death at his opponents. Tracy, meanwhile, takes his law and order campaign to television, while his past catches up to him when a criminal he helped convict twenty years ago puts the detective on his "to kill" list. To round out this volume, the squadroom is kept busy with two members of B.O. Plenty's extended family who are anything but law-abiding--Perfume Plenty and her larcenous cousin Dade. All this and more in the ultimate volume of Chester Gould's Dick Tracy, collecting strips from March 15, 1976 to December 25, 1977.

The series is ripe to introduce to crime prose readers who haven't previously ventured into comics.

  • Published: 8 March 2021
  • ISBN: 9781684057528
  • Imprint: IDW Publishing
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $79.99

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Praise for Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 29

“Chester Gould introduced a new hard-hitting type of realism [that] marked a radical and historic departure: the comics were no longer just funny." --Jerry Robinson, The Comics "Chester Gould's paragon of avenging normalcy was not your average, tough-guy detective. A unique combination of brawn and brains, he prefigured a whole new breed of scientific sleuths, whose recourse to technical innovations in criminology gave them the edge on grifters and hoods." --Robert Storr, Dean, Yale University School of Art (from Masters of American Comics) "This black and white morality play of Good vs. Evil was famously haunted by its gallery of grotesque and aptly named villains like Mumbles, the Brow and Flattop. Each of their faces was literally a "map," a map of hell, indicated by the most peculiar configuration of lines the artist could manage. What great cartooning...it's time to build new bookshelves to welcome one of America's singular artistic achievements." --Art Spiegelman

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