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About the book
  • Published: 23 June 2020
  • ISBN: 9781684056903
  • Imprint: IDW Publishing
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $75.00

Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 28


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The adventures of this iconic square-jawed detective fighting a menagerie of grotesque villains remains one of the highlights in the history of not just comics but crime fiction in general.

In these latter-day Dick Tracy adventures Chester Gould again proves that he was never one to rest on his laurels. The square-jawed detective fights it out with one thug after another, including Lispy and the visually grotesque villain appropriately named The Brain. These stories are replete with murder, suicide, gangland execution, dope smuggling, a deadly natural disaster, and not one but two main characters on the verge of death. The singular motive behind it all? Money, plenty of money.

All this and the return of retired Chief Brandon in the penultimate volume of Chester Gould's Dick Tracy, collecting strips from July 7, 1974 to March 14, 1976.

  • Pub date: 23 June 2020
  • ISBN: 9781684056903
  • Imprint: IDW Publishing
  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 288
  • RRP: $75.00

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Praise for Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy Volume 28

““Chester Gould introduced a new hard-hitting type of realism [that] marked a radical and historic departure: the comics were no longer just funny." — Jerry Robinson, The Comics "Chester Gould's paragon of avenging normalcy was not your average, tough-guy detective. A unique combination of brawn and brains, he prefigured a whole new breed of scientific sleuths, whose recourse to technical innovations in criminology gave them the edge on grifters and hoods." — Robert Storr, Dean, Yale University School of Art (from Masters of American Comics) "This black and white morality play of Good vs. Evil was famously haunted by its gallery of grotesque and aptly named villains like Mumbles, the Brow and Flattop. Each of their faces was literally a "map," a map of hell, indicated by the most peculiar configuration of lines the artist could manage. What great cartooning...it's time to build new bookshelves to welcome one of America's singular artistic achievements." — Art Spiegelman”


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